Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Published 9:30 AM by with 2 comments

200% Rule: You have to be twice as good to get the same opportunities

200% Rule:  You have to be twice as good to get the same opportunities| Yes, We Rise

200% Rule-The real reality show



This is the well-known rule within the Black community that you have to be twice as good to get the same opportunities. Before this “post-racial period” (insert sarcasm here) most Black students were told by their teachers, parents and community leaders that they had to try harder because, in essence, you are seen by your melanin content before anything else.

Several recent articles have reiterated the same refrain. There is some truth to this White Male Privilege (Black Men Need More Education Than White Men to Get Jobs). Now this isn't a woe is me, woe is you tale. It is a statement of fact. I am enough a student of history to know that even though it is still not perfect, it is better than it was and we have a long way to go.

We have the highest educational rate in American history: 90% high school completion (87.7 for Black males) compared to 94.1 & 93.3 for Whites & White Males (2013). These figures are up from 6.3% for Blacks and 22% in 1920 (Digest for Educational Statistics, 2013). Interestingly enough only 3.3% of the Blacks have a masters or higher (1.5 male) compared to 8.6 for Whites (6.3 White males), which means many of my Facebook friends and I are, seemingly, as rare as unicorns.

We are getting better, but there is still a long way to go. The media tells us, and subsequently we believe, that we are hopelessly behind. We fall for this self-fulfilling prophesy because there aren't enough micro-leaders out there telling the truth. We have value, we are somebody & education is the key.

We are worrying about the wrong things and then we expect things to change. Things will not change when it is more profitable to allow the status quo to remain. Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. Recent events have shown that we are under attack from within and without. We have to answer our problems before we go forward and fix the entrenched issues that endangered our children, communities and the nation as a whole.

History is indeed repeating itself -- police brutality, dysfunctional communities and riots. This isn't 1964 or 1984... it is 2014.

Where is the leadership? Who is asleep at the wheel? Aren't we all?

If there is no one to tell the youth that you have to work harder, take pride in your work and make sure that your work is not in vain... then what were our ancestor’s sacrifices for? The saying that a literate slave is an unhappy slave is true. Once you know and understand the truth, the sane choice is to change the game.

We have some leadership at the community level but many of us are waiting for somebody, anybody, to do something. That someone is you. We must challenge our youth to be more than the next. They may need to be the first.

The Negro National Anthem's second stanza pretty much sums up how we must conduct ourselves. I guess some people will feel some kind of way about this piece.


Stony the road we trod,
Bitter the chastening rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat,
Have not our weary feet
Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over a way that with tears has been watered,
We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered,
Out from the gloomy past,
Till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.





Digest of Educational Statistics http://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d13/tables/dt13_104.20.asp
National Center for Educational Statistics http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=27
photo credit: Neil. Moralee via photopin cc






2 comments:

  1. Thank you Doctor White.

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  2. Word Mark! Great perspective and insight my brother. This was my point of my response to the previous blog. The conspiracy is an actual fact alive and well in 2014.. Now we have the microcosm of Love and Hip Hop being spread on a larger scale of what Black relationships are inside the Hip Hop culture. Until WE stand up and show who we really are our state of affairs here and around the world will only become worse.. and what's crazy is that WE will not have anything to show for it. Imagine if you will your Great Grandson or Great Grand Daughter studying HIStory 50 years from now. What do you think that the story will be told to them? Unfortunately I believe that it would be a story that doesn't have enough substance about positive contributions to the culture but a story that resembles the inferior uncivilized mental slave...
    Now don't get me twisted. I still believe that WE are the most resilient and powerful people on this planet. We have proven time and again this fact. Have my generation gotten soft in some areas? Absolutely without a doubt. My point is this. I am all for the 1st Amendment and freedom of speech. However; there is a level of responsibility with speech and the expression thereof. I would challenge that if WE stopped purchasing music and supporting media in general that glorifies the negative ills of a particular social condition. i. e. Gangsta Thugging, Pimping, Hoeing, Drugs, Hustling both the conspirators and the artist would then have to conform to what WE say is an acceptable representation of the Culture. PEACE!

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